Prom dress sale Sunday in Wahpeton

From 12-1 p.m. Sunday, there will be a pre-shopping event for young women in need of a free prom dress. Interested young women and their families can contact their school counselor or Beth Higdem.  

A high school prom comes once a year, but a gently used prom dress can last longer than that.

From 1-5 p.m. Sunday, March 3, Wahpeton High School is hosting a prom dress sale. Young women and families in the Twin Towns Area are encouraged to come and buy an affordable prom dress or sell one of their gently used items.

“Prom dresses are expensive and several girls in the area are unable to afford a dress,” said Beth Higdem, who teaches in Wahpeton.

Gently used prom dresses will be on sale in the Wahpeton High School gymnasium. Shoppers are not charged any admission, but are required to donate at least two items to the Richland-Wilkin Food Backpack Program.

“We’re seeking peanut butter, fruit cups, boxes of fruit snacks and boxes of granola bars,” Higdem continued.

The prom dress sale is a new event in the Twin Towns Area.

“Sellers will stay with their dress to answer shopper questions or negotiate a price,” Higdem explained. “If you would like to reserve a spot, 

please contact me.”

Sellers are also not charged any participation fee. They are required to donate at least five items to the backpack program.

Additionally, dress donations are being accepted. They can be dropped off between 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at Wahpeton Elementary. For more information, contact Higdem at 701-640-5665 or by e-mailing Bethany.Higdem@k12.nd.us.

From 12-1 p.m. Sunday, there will be a pre-shopping event for young women in need of a free prom dress. Interested young women and their families can contact their school counselor or Higdem.  

“I see lots of people on Facebook trying to sell their dresses,” Higdem explained. “We know there are families who can’t afford a brand new dress, or a dress at all. This is a way to recycle those dresses.”

The prom dress sale is also beneficial because it allows young women and their families to see a dress in person rather than through the Internet. Additionally, Higdem is glad to have a way to raise money for the Food Backpack Program.

“We have about 25 committed sellers right now and 10 dresses that have been donated,” she said. “We’re expecting more as the event comes closer.”

Higdem was a co-organizer of the “Back to School One Stop Shop,” held in August 2018. The event featured distribution of free backpacks filled with school supplies, free coats for youth and free clothing for boys and girls of all ages.

“We actually filled up the whole high school lunch room area with backpacks and tons of clothes to give away,” Higdem recalled. “There ended up being only six boxes worth of clothing left. I kept the leftovers. Now, whenever we have new students coming in who need them, we’re able to provide clothing.”

Higdem is hopeful the prom dress sale will be another success.

“We want girls that can’t afford dresses to be able to go to prom,” she said. “They should have the fun experience without the hassle of spending more than they should. We also want the many girls who have only worn a prom dress once to be able to pass them on. And, of course, we want to have a good haul for the Food Backpack Program.”

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